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Your solar feed-in rates

This information is valid for customers on the DC Power Co Market Offer, which is no longer available to join.

If you’re looking to find out more about current energy offers, please head over to  dcpowerco.com.au/offer for more information about our exceptional solar service and insights bundled with Powershop’s 100% carbon offset energy.

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DC Power Co offers a 15 c/kWh feed-in tariff for customers on the DC Power Co Market Offer.

If you’re on a premium feed-in tariff (that’s 60c/kWh in Victoria or 44c/kWh in Queensland), your total solar feed-in tariff with us will be 75c/kWh in Victoria or 59c/kWh in Queensland. 

More information and the solar feed-in rate card for each state can be found below.

 

Solar feed-in tariff VIC

 

Solar feed-in rate card – VIC

 

What is a solar feed-in tariff?

If you have solar panels, your power company pays you a rate for the solar electricity you export to the grid. That rate is called the solar feed-in tariff (or FiT). Ours is 15 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh).

 

There are two main types of feed-in tariffs

Standard solar feed-in tariff VIC

Over three-quarters of solar households get a standard feed-in tariff. Depending on the state, electricity companies are either regulated or recommended to provide a certain feed-in tariff by state governments.

What does that mean in Victoria? In Victoria, a minimum FiT of 9.9c is regulated until 1 July 2019. Then it will increase to 12.0c.

On the DC Power Co Market Offer, you get a 15c solar feed-in tariff across all the states we service.

 

Premium solar feed-in tariff VIC

You may think a premium feed-in tariff is just a really good one, but that’s not the case. To encourage people to install solar panels between 2009 and 2011, state governments offered an extra FiT to add to what electricity companies provide.

In Victoria, people who installed solar systems within this period and got the premium FiT, still receive it. That’s 60c, paid until 2024. (That’s 75c with DC Power Co.)

As a general rule of thumb if your feed-in tariff is higher than ~40c, you’re likely on a premium feed-in tariff. If your feed-in tariff is below ~25c, you’re likely on a standard feed-in tariff.

You can find more information about solar feed-in rates on the DC Power Co blog.

 

 

Solar feed-in tariff NSW

 

Solar feed-in rate card – NSW

 

What is a solar feed-in tariff?

If you have solar panels, your power company pays you a rate for the solar electricity you export to the grid. That rate is called the solar feed-in tariff (or FiT). Ours is 15 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh).

 

There are two main types of feed-in tariffs

Standard solar feed-in tariff NSW

Over three-quarters of solar households get a standard feed-in tariff. Depending on the state, electricity companies are either regulated or recommended to provide a certain feed-in tariff by state governments.

What does that mean in NSW? In New South Wales there is a recommended range of 6.9 to 8.4c set until 1 July 2019.

On the DC Power Co Market Offer, you get a 15c solar feed-in tariff across all the states we service.

 

Premium solar feed-in tariff NSW

To encourage people to install solar panels between 2010 and 2011, state governments offered an extra FiT to add to what electricity companies provide. The premium feed-in tariff scheme in New South Wales has now ended which means there are no more premium feed-in tariffs available in New South Wales.

You can find more information about solar feed-in rates on the DC Power Co blog

 

 

Solar feed-in tariff QLD

 

Solar feed-in rate card – QLD

 

What is a solar feed-in tariff?

If you have solar panels, your power company pays you a rate for the solar electricity you export to the grid. That rate is called the solar feed-in tariff (or FiT). Ours is 15 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh).

 

There are two main types of feed-in tariffs

Standard solar feed-in tariff QLD

Over three-quarters of solar households get a standard feed-in tariff. Depending on the state, electricity companies are often either regulated or recommended to provide a certain feed-in tariff by state governments.

What does that mean in Queensland? South-East QLD is one of the few areas where there is no regulated feed-in tariff. Power companies are free to choose their own price. The rest of QLD is regulated to offer a minimum FiT of 9,4c.

On the DC Power Co Market Offer, you get a 15c solar feed-in tariff across all the states we service.

 

Premium solar feed-in tariff QLD

You may think a premium feed-in tariff is just a really good one, but that’s not the case. To encourage people to install solar panels between 2008 and 2012, state governments offered an extra FiT to add to what electricity companies provide.

In Queensland it’s 44c, paid until 2028. (That’s 59c with DC Power Co.)

As a general rule of thumb if your feed-in tariff is higher than ~40c, you’re likely on a premium feed-in tariff. If your feed-in tariff is below ~25c, you’re likely on a standard feed-in tariff.

You can find more information about solar feed-in rates on the DC Power Co blog.

 

 

Solar feed-in tariff South Australia

 

Solar feed-in rate card – SA

 

What is a solar feed-in tariff?

If you have solar panels, your power company pays you a rate for the solar electricity you export to the grid. That rate is called the solar feed-in tariff (or FiT). Ours is 15 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh).

 

There are two main types of feed-in tariffs

Standard solar feed-in tariff SA

Over three-quarters of solar households get a standard feed-in tariff. Depending on the state, electricity companies are often either regulated or recommended to provide a certain feed-in tariff by state governments.

What does that mean in South Australia? South Australia is one of the few areas where there is no regulated feed-in tariff. Power companies are free to choose their own price.

On the DC Power Co Market Offer, you get a 15c solar feed-in tariff across all the states we service.

 

Premium solar feed-in tariff South Australia

You may think a premium feed-in tariff is just a really good one, but that’s not the case. To encourage people to install solar panels between 2008 and 2012, state governments offered an extra FiT to add to what electricity companies provide.

In South Australia it’s 44c, paid until 2028. (That’s 59c with DC Power Co.)

As a general rule of thumb if your feed-in tariff is higher than ~40c, you’re likely on a premium feed-in tariff. If your feed-in tariff is below ~25c, you’re likely on a standard feed-in tariff.

You can find more information about solar feed-in rates on the DC Power Co blog.

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